eNews: Law

Posted to: Law | 10/05/2016

Police in Canada use polygraph tests in their investigations, but the results generally cannot be used as evidence in court. Courts have found polygraph results to be unnecessary, unreliable, and risky as evidence in criminal trials, although the law is not quite so clear in family matters.

Posted to: Law | 03/05/2016

When asked to choose the court decision they found most interesting and significant two UBC law students serving as interns in the Provincial Court selected the same Supreme Court of Canada case. Can you guess what case they chose?

Posted to: Judges, Law | 16/02/2016

A recent Ottawa Citizen column commented on an incident in R. v. Elliott, a prosecution for criminal harassment involving Twitter activity.

Posted to: Law | 02/02/2016

A person who fears violence from a family member may be able to get a protection order in family court.

Section 183(2) of the BC Family Law Act says:

Posted to: Help, Law | 29/12/2015

Judges must make decisions based only on the evidence (what you say in the witness box, documents, photographs, etc.) presented during a trial, so be sure to bring ALL the documents that you want the judge to see with you to court on the day of your hearing or trial.

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